Swarag – Ghost story (5)

Hi all Sorry For Being Late in posting the Story as am not well Couldn’t post the story .
Thank you all for your beautiful comments .

That weekend, Swara was finally able to sneak into the garage to see the Chief again. She walked across the back yard, being watchful to make sure no one saw her enter the garage. Once inside, she shut the door. It was very dark in the garage with only a thin shaft of sunlight from the window, and it seemed eerie and cold. But she knew the Chief was not a scary or mean ghost, and he meant her no harm.
She waited for several minutes for the whirlwind of dust to appear, but it did not. She was not sure what triggered the appearance of the Chief.
“Hello?” she whispered. She waited and waited, but nothing happened.
“Chief Rajat Sharma?” she spoke in a normal voice, it echoed in the garage. Still, nothing happened. Finally, she grew impatient.
“Hey!” she yelled. “Wake up!”

She heard a long, low groaning wail. It was a very scary noise, and she dove for the door and grabbed the handle. Looking back, the dust on the floor began to whirl and the groaning grew louder and scarier. Was it possible she had made the Chief angry? She began to turn the handle as the dust cloud solidified into the form of the Chief. He stood in the thin beam of sunlight his mouth open, and he groaned hideously.
“Now you’ve done it,” the Chief said. “You scared away my dinner!”
Swara removed her hand from the door handle and giggled. “Sorry, sir, I just wanted to see you.”
The Chief blinked at her. He held a bow in one hand with an arrow. He scratched his face and shook his head.
“Well, it’s gone now,” he said. “What do you want?”
Swara scowled, “I just wanted to say hi.”
“Well, you said hi, now why don’t you let me get back to my hunt?” the Chief said.
Swara placed her hands on her hips. “Well, I would have stayed away if I had known you were going to be such a grouch! Besides, why does a ghost need to hunt?”
“Ghost?” The Chief looked at her oddly. “I am no ghost. You are the ghost.”
“What?” Swara said. “I’m not a ghost. You are.”
“I am not,” the Chief said. “I am very much alive. It is sad that you do not realize you are a ghost.”

Swara folded her arms across her chest and glared back. “Oh yeah? I could say the same for you! You are the ghost living in my garage.”
“Garage?” the Chief said. “What is… garage?”
Swara waved her hand around the room. “You are in my garage. Can’t you see that?”
The Chief’s face wrinkled. “What do you see where you are?”
Swara rolled her eyes. “There is some dusty furniture, cardboard boxes full of old junk, and an old bike with flat tires.”
The Chief looked around. “What you speak of is very strange to me. I see the open prairie. There is a grove of trees over that way.” He pointed to the back of the garage. “A herd of deer and the teepees of my village lie just visible just beyond the creek.”
Swara gazed at the drab walls of the garage. “I think you are confused.”
The Chief laughed. “Perhaps we are both confused. You say I am a ghost and we are standing in garage. I say you are a ghost and we are standing on the prairie. So we are both wrong or we are both right. We must find a way to know.”
Swara growled, “Well, you are the ghost; I already know this!”

The Chief raised his bow and fired an arrow at Swara. Before she could react, the arrow passed completely through her chest. She placed her hands over where the hole should be and glared at the Chief.
“Hey! What did you do that for?”
“My arrow passed through you without causing injury,” the Chief said. “Therefore you are the ghost.”
“Oh yeah?” Swara looked around on the floor of the garage, and found an old paperback book lying at her feet. She picked it up and hurled it at the Chief with all her strength. The book flew through the Chief and hit the wall behind him. The chief looked down at his chest where the book passed through and frowned.
“Perhaps we are both ghosts.”
“Maybe we are both real,” Swara said.
“I think we are both real,” the Chief said. “I like that idea better, since I know I am not a ghost, and you insist you are not as well.”
“So why are you here?” Swara asked.
“I was hunting a deer when you appeared from a cloud of dust. You yelled and scared the deer away.”
Swara squinted. “I appeared? But I’ve been here for a long time. I didn’t just appear.”
“And I have been here for a long time,” the Chief said. “And when I have seen you before, it has always been upon this spot. This place my people call the dreaming place.”
“The dreaming place,” Swara said.
“This is where my people come to sleep so they can speak with the spirits. We are shown many wondrous things in our dreams.”
“Do you come here to dream?” Swara asked.
“I have, but I have seen nothing so wondrous in my dreams. It is only now, in my waking times, that I see you, a little girl with white skin, who appears before me like a ghost,” the Chief said. “At first I thought I must have been sleeping and that I dreamed of you; but now I know I am awake.” He rubbed his chin. “Unless I am sleeping now on this ground and I was dreaming of the hunt.” He held up his arm and pinched a bit of skin with his other hand. “I think that I am not asleep.”

Swara pinched herself as well. “I think I am not asleep either, but somehow, we can see each other.”
“It is the dreaming place,” the Chief said. “Strange things happen here. But I need to finish my hunt. My family needs meat.” The Chief reloaded his bow and began to walk away.
“Wait,” Swara said. “Will you come back?”
“If you will be here,” the chief replied. “I will come back again.”
“Then so will I,” Swara said.
The Chief smiled at her as he swirled into dust and drifted to the floor.

Swara and her friend Kavya stood in the backyard. Kavya gazed warily at the garage.
“So are you sure he’s friendly?” Kavya asked.
Swara giggled, “Oh, totally. He is funny too. He shot an arrow through me.”
Kavya looked at Swara doubtfully. “An Arrow? Through you?”
“He did. The arrow went completely through me without hurting.” Swara grabbed Sydni’s hand and pulled her towards the garage. “We need to hurry. Mom will be calling us for dinner.”
Swara pulled Kavya into the garage and closed the door behind them. It was dark inside with only the light coming from the hole in the window. The garage was unusually dusty, and everything was coated thick with it.
“Hey!” Swara called. “Chief Rajat Sharma. Are you here?”
Kavyaclung to Swara’s arm and gazed into the darkness.
“How do you know when he’s here?” Kavyaasked, her voice echoed in the quiet garage.
“You’ll see,” Swara said. “It’s pretty cool.”
“Is it like a flash of light or something?” Kavyaasked.
Just then, a tiny dust cloud in the middle of the floor began to form and spin. Swara smiled and pointed.
“Watch that,” she said. Kavyamoved behind Swara; her eyes were as big as saucers.

The little dust cloud grew taller and whirled faster and faster and began to spread outward into the room.
“Swara! Kavya! It’s time for dinner!” Swara’s mom yelled from the house.
Swara glanced at the garage door. “Oh darn! We won’t get to talk to him.”
Kavya gasped, and Swara looked back at the swirling dust. It was moving very fast, and had grown quite large. In fact, it was larger than she had ever seen it. In moments, the cloud expanded and filled the entire room. The girls covered their faces as the cloud grew so large, it surrounded them. The whirling air shrieked in her ears, and Swara thought she could hear someone yelling. The air swirling around them became so intense that both girls fell to the floor. Swara squinted through the storm and saw boxes and paper whirling around the centre of the tornado. The old couch flew by over her head, twisting violently in the storm. As the couch spun around the centre of the twister, it dipped low and looked like it was going to land directly on them. She cried out and laid flat on the garage floor.
As quickly as it started, the wind stopped. Swara raised her head. She was lying next to Kavya in tall, green grass. The sun was shining and a gentle breeze blew rustling the grass. A tiny bird flew by and twittered. They rose to their knees and looked around.

Where’s the garage?” Kavya asked. “The house? Where are we?”
There was a grove of trees nearby, and they could see a long line of trees where the creek must run. There were no houses, no cars, and no people anywhere. Somehow, the land seemed familiar, but it was different. In the distance were the mountains she always saw from her house, but the buildings of the small town where they lived were gone.

Any Guesses where they must have gone ?????

15 comments

  1. Arshi

    |Registered Member

    Omg… i just saw ur fifth part.. by the name i got artracted… and read… but its reallllllyyyh awesome than the name… i couldnt hold myself so long.. so gng to read previous parts…

    Dear u kneeled it… i have no words…. superb se bhi bahuth uper tha….

    • Arshi

      |Registered Member

      Hey swathi sharu… just read ur previous parts… it was dam amazing dear… oh no.. now how could hold myself till ur next update…

      Btwn… who s kavya.. i think.. its ragini…. in last part ragini saw chief along with swara… then where s ragini… if kavya is another frnd… i would like to have swara with rgini also with kavya

  2. Alisha

    |Registered Member

    They are in his world now. The dream world! Yay, this is super interesting. I am loving it. You write so well. Rajat Sharma is literally so funny. His dialogues and his and Swara’s fight.. Loved every part of the episode. Keep writing! ?❤️??

  3. chandu

    omg!!!! your ff was really intresting and mind blowing!!! Loved it!!! I think they have gone to that ghost’s reality place!!

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